Call on Cabinet tomorrow to establish a Royal Commission of Inquiry on the May 13, 1969 racial riots not to punish the culprits but to allow the country to heal its worst racial wounds

August 27, 2013 at 1:02 am Leave a comment

Tanda Putera

Shuhaimi Baba should seriously consider my advice that although she prides herself as the original founder of horror films after directing a Pontianak film, she must not regard the May 13,1969 movie “Tanda Putra” as belonging to the genre of “ghost films” she had directed in the past, but must be conscious of a sense of responsibility to the nation especially to the present and future generation of Malaysians to protect and promote inter-racial goodwill, peace and harmony in the country.

Shuhaimi should therefore list out what are the fictional or unverified incidents on the May 13, 1969 riots in her “Tanda Putra” movie so as not to mislead and incite Malaysians resulting in worsening race relations in the country.

This is all the more imperative as Shuhaimi has admitted that the film is a fictional account of events surrounding the May 13, 1969 racial riots.

On Feb 21 this year, Malaysiakini carried a film review entitled “Tanda Putera a double-edged sword” by a “film enthusiast” who had the opportunity to watch the film at one of the previews held for different groups over the previous months, and it is clear from the film review that the film is studded with fictional or unverified incidents on the May 13, 1969 riots which could mislead and incite inter-racial mistrust, hatred and even conflict.

I refer to three incidents cited by the film review:

1. “Another scene shows a group of Chinese youth urinating on a flag pole bearing the Selangor flag, outside the residence of the then state menteri besar Harun Idris.”

2. “In another scene at a cinema, the screen suddenly blacks out, replaced with Mandarin words asking the Chinese to leave the venue, which they do.

“A man then shouts out, in Malay, why there were Chinese words on the screen and demands the movie be put back on. Then, suddenly, the remaining audience in the cinema is massacred.”

3. “Throughout the build-up of tensions and race riots, there is a mysterious Chinese man who observes the happenings. He is later revealed to be a communist leader – indicating that the communists may have had a hand in orchestrating the mayhem.”

I have questioned the historical veracity of the urination incident in the first instance.

Are the second and third “incidents” factual or are they pure figments of the imagination and totally fictional?

In my first speech in Parliament 42 years ago on February 23, 1971, I called for a Commission of Inquiry into the May 13, 1969 racial riots to find out their causes, assess the racial polarization in the country and to make recommendations to prevent a recurrence of the May 13, 1969 racial riots and arrest the racial polarization in the country.

Instead of spending public funds to allow a movie director the “creative licence” to concoct fictitious events purportedly provoking the May 13, 1969 riots, I call on the Cabinet tomorrow to establish a Royal Commission of Inquiry on the May 13, 1969 racial riots.

The RCI on the May 13, 1969 riots should be tasked to ascertain the true events and causes of the May 13 riots, who were responsible for them, not so much to apportion blame or to punish the culprits as 44 years had elapsed since the occurrence of the national tragedy in 1969, but to ascertain the true causes and developments to present the historical truth to present and future generations and to heal the country’s worst racial wounds and remove the spectre of May 13 from being used at every general elections since 1969 to blackmail voters from freely exercising their constitutional right to vote or to justify the pursuit of divisive and unjust policies.

RCI on May 13 can heal racial wounds, Kit Siang tells Cabinet

BY MELISSA CHI
AUGUST 27, 2013

KUALA LUMPUR, Aug 27 — The Cabinet should set up a royal commission of inquiry (RCI) into the events surrounding the May 13, 1969 riots to help heal the nation of its worst racial wounds and move on, the DAP’s Lim Kit Siang (picture)said today.

The senior opposition lawmaker had first mooted the call 42 years ago in his parliamentary debut and revisited the idea in a bid to put a lid on the touchy subject that is being stirred up by local film “Tanda Putera”, which premiered last week.

“Instead of spending public funds to allow a movie director the ‘creative licence’ to concoct fictitious events purportedly provoking the May 13, 1969 riots, I call on the Cabinet tomorrow to establish a royal commission of inquiry on the May 13, 1969 racial riots,” the Gelang Patah MP said in a statement.

Prime Minister Datuk Seri Najib Razak and his Cabinet usually meet on Wednesdays.

Lim said his proposal for the RCI on May 13, 44 years after it happened, was not to dole out blame or “punish the culprits… but to ascertain the true causes and developments to present the historical truth to present and future generations and to heal the country’s worst racial wounds and remove the spectre of May 13 from being used at every general election since 1969 to blackmail voters from freely exercising their constitutional right to vote or to justify the pursuit of  divisive and unjust policies.”

The DAP adviser has been engaged in a war of words with “Tanda Putera” director Datin Paduka Shuhaimi Baba for the past year since news broke of an “inflammatory” scene of a Chinese man urinating on a flag pole at the Selangor mentri besar’s residence in the historical film.

The offending scene became the focal point of controversy when an administrator posted on Facebook a photograph ostensibly of the scene along with a caption: “Lim Kit Siang telah kencing di bawah tiang bendera Selangor yang terpacak di rumah menteri besar Selangor ketika itu, Harun Idris, (Lim Kit Siang had urinated at the foot of the flagpole bearing the Selangor flag at the then Selangor MB’s Harun Idris’ house).”

Lim had last year threatened to sue over the photograph and the caption which the “Tanda Putera” executive producer alleged was posted by a fan on the film’s Facebook page without the producers’ knowledge.

“Tanda Putera” was produced at a cost of RM4.8 million provided by the National Film Development Corporation (Finas) and the Multimedia Development Corporation (MdeC).

It had originally been scheduled to be released on September 13 last year, before being postponed to November 13 and subsequently put on hold indefinitely.

Since then, it has been shown in private screenings to an assortment of viewers such as a gathering of Felda settlers in February and at an invitation-only event for International Islamic University students a month later.

“Tanda Putera” is now scheduled to open in cinemas this Thursday.

Kit Siang wants RCI on May 13 bloodletting

MalaysiakiniMalaysiakini – 2 hours 58 minutes ago

DAP veteran Lim Kit Siang has called on the cabinet to establish a Royal Commission of Inquiry (RCI) on the May 13, 1969, racial riots.

Lim said this was not to punish the culprits but to allow the country to heal its worst racial wounds

Taking a swipe at Shuhaimi Baba, who directed the controversial Tanda Putra movie, Lim said a RCI would be more meaningful as opposed to spending public funds to allow a movie director the “creative licence” to “concoct fictitious events purportedly provoking the May 13, 1969, riots”.

Lim added in a statement today: “The RCI should be tasked to ascertain the true events and causes of the riots, who were responsible for them, not so much to apportion blame or to punish the culprits as 44 years have elapsed since the occurrence of the national tragedy in 1969.

“It should be to ascertain the true causes and developments to present the historical truth to the present and future generations, to heal the country’s worst racial wounds and to remove the spectre of May 13 from being used at every general election since 1969 to blackmail voters.”

As for Shuhaimi, Lim said the director should seriously consider his advice that although she prides herself as the original founder of horror films after directing a Pontianak film, she must not regard Tanda Putra as belonging to the genre of ghost films.

“She must be conscious of a sense of responsibility to the nation, especially to the present and future generations of Malaysians, to protect and promote inter-racial goodwill, peace and harmony in the country,” he said.

In view of this, Lim said, Suhaimi should list out the fictional or unverified incidents of the May 13 riots in her movie, so as not to mislead and incite Malaysians and thereby worsen race relations in the country.

“This is all the more imperative as Shuhaimi has admitted that the film is a fictional account of events surrounding the May 13 racial riots,” Lim added.

Tanda Putera a double-edged sword

Carrie Rina

Malaysiakini
12:13PM Feb 21, 2013

FILM REVIEW Despite the cabinet deciding against airing the controversial Tanda Putera film until after the next general election, the leader of the same cabinet, Najib Abdul Razak, appears keen on showing it to selected segments of the Malaysian populace.

The reason is likely that the film is a double-edged sword, serving as an effective propaganda tool for one community – but which may well offend the other communities.

While both the Malays and Chinese are depicted in the film as turning on each other during the May 13 riots, the Chinese were often characterised as the aggressors.

The film opens with a group of Chinese, who appear to be Communist sympathisers, attacking a party worker, and calling for the 1969 general election to be boycotted.

The victim was later revealed to be an Umno member, for news flash with the headline: ‘Umno party worker killed’ is shown.

A voice then narrates that victory marchers had chanted “Melayu balik kampung” (Malays should go back to their villages), hurting the feelings of Malays and thus triggering the May 13 race riots.

The build-up to the tension in the film shows a group of Chinese youths vandalising campaign materials.

They are later, when fleeing, shot by the police, causing anger among the Chinese community.

Later, an angry crowd of Chinese protesters assembles and their leader tells the crowd not to give reasons for the police to arrest them, for they could take “revenge” during the general election six days later.

After the general election, several scenes are shown, presumably of opposition supporters of Chinese descent, laying claim to to Selangor after the incumbent Alliance (present day BN) failed to obtain a majority to form the state government.

The antagonists

A scene showing a group of Chinese on a lorry entering a Malay kampung, declaring that the area now belonged to them, raises tension and the police step in to prevent a clash.

Another scene shows a group of Chinese youth urinating on a flag pole bearing the Selangor flag, outside the residence of the then state menteri besar Harun Idris.

The group declares that Kuala Lumpur – then still a part of Selangor – belonged to them and the menteri besar should get out.

At another protest, the crowd chants slogans in Chinese. A Malay police officer there shifts uncomfortably when he is told that they were chanting “Malays go die”.

In yet another scene in Setapak, a group of Chinese refuse to allow two Malay youths on a motorcycle to pass through, claiming that the area now belonged to them. The pair were beaten up when they insisted on passing through, until the police intervened.

The duo, beaten bloody, subsequently made it to Kampung Baru where a rally led by then-menteri besar Harun of Umno was going on.

Enraged by this, the Malay crowd took it out on a passing vehicle whose driver was Chinese and he was killed. Later, a similar Chinese crowd also went about hunting for Malays.

In another scene at a cinema, the screen suddenly blacks out, replaced with Mandarin words asking the Chinese to leave the venue, which they do.

A man then shouts out, in Malay, why there were Chinese words on the screen and demands the movie be put back on. Then, suddenly, the remaining audience in the cinema is massacred.

Throughout the build-up of tensions and race riots, there is a mysterious Chinese man who observes the happenings. He is later revealed to be a communist leader – indicating that the communists may have had a hand in orchestrating the mayhem.

This angle in Tanda Putera could likely have been derived from former prime minister Tunku Abdul Rahman’s book, titled May 13: Before and After, which was published in the same year of the riots and in which he blamed the communists.

Countering alternative takes

However, the film also seeks to portray the Umno leaders then as having taken every precaution to prevent the racial riots.

Prior to the Umno rally going awry, Harun is shown reiterating that the rally should be peaceful and urges participants to put away their weapons.

Even when the participants went out of control after witnessing the two bloodied youths, Harun repeatedly shouts for them to stop, until he suffers chest pains.

The scene appears to counter the version of the May 13 riots by author Kua Kia Soong in his book entitled May 13: Declassified Documents on the Malaysian Riots of 1969.

Kua’s book had blamed, among others, Harun for orchestrating the riots in a bid to oust the then prime minister Tunku Abdul Rahman.

The book, which was based on British declassified documents detailing observations by foreign diplomats and correspondents using dispatches in the country, also appeared to receive another rebuttal as the film portrayed these sources negatively.

In one scene, a group of foreign correspondents is shown arguing with an official as they are not allowed out due to a curfew, and subsequently they say they will write with their “imagination” since their movements are restricted.

The National Operations Council chairperson then, and subsequent second prime minister Abdul Razak Hussein, also raps a foreign diplomat for disputing the casualty figure in the riots, demanding the source of information, to which the diplomat is unable to answer.

The portrayal will a good reminder to audiences of the May 13 racial riots – the version as told, and in which the fear spectre is often raised by the establishment.

The film also focuses on a group of class of students of various races and their lecturer, who are threatened by Malay and Chinese mobs.

Despite their efforts to help one another regardless of race, they eventually drifted apart due to racial fears. But they later make up, as the country pulls away from this dark history under Abdul Razak’s premiership.

These scenes make up about an hour of the film and in the second hour, the attention shifts to Razak and his deputy, Dr Ismail Abdul Rahman.

Idolising Abdul Razak

Though Tanda Putera also touches on the struggle against the communist threat, the New Economic Policy as well as BN’s 1974 general election victory, they come in flashes as the attention is on the two leaders.

Razak and Ismail are gravely ill, but they conceal their illnesses from their families and struggle to perform their duties in the short lives they had.

It also tells of their close friendship, and in one instance, Ismail asks Razak to take his personal doctor along for the 1973 Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting in Canada, after learning of the Razak’s illness.

Ismail died of a heart attack when Razak was in Canada. Razak later insisted that Ismail be buried in the Heroes’ Mausoleum.

The pace of the second part of the film is significantly slower than the first, but was emotionally manipulative.

It portrays Razak’s slow and painful death and his family’s struggle to cope with the predicament.

As his condition deteriorated, one of his sons, Johari, spent most of the time by his deathbed but there are mentions of one “Jib” over the telephone, presumably present-day Prime Minister Najib.

After Razak’s death, there are several flashes of Razak interacting with common folk and how he had touched their lives.

One example is when he visits a run-down school and meets a teacher wearing a torn tie.

Razak immediately instructs that the facilities be upgraded, the children be provided with necessities and even gets the teacher a new tie.

The film’s portrayal of Razak is simplistic, with the bulk of it dedicated to idolising the former premier who oversaw several landmark policies of the BN, such as the New Economic Policy, Malay as the national language and Felda schemes.

No doubt large parts of the film are indeed based on research material, but they are religiously derived from the official versions.

Watching Tanda Putera may well be akin to flipping through a secondary school textbook, one-sided and shallow in its presentation, lacking in depth and hardly thought-provoking.

The scenes in the film will resonate well with BN’s age-old messages, but airing it to the general populace now will likely solicit controversy and debate, which may prove risky so near to a general election.

‘CARRIE RINA’ is a pseudonym. The writer is a film enthusiast who had the opportunity to watch the film at one of its previews held for different groups over the past months.

MCA’s Wee hits out at “creative licence” of Tanda Putera, says it’s irresponsible

BY TRINNA LEONG
August 27, 2013
Latest Update: August 27, 2013 07:57 pm

Tanda Putera director should not use her “creative licence” to portray inflammatory scenes in a historical film, said MCA National Youth Chief Datuk Dr Wee Ka Siong (pic) today.

“The line must be drawn between fact and fiction,” said Wee in statement, the first pro-government politician to speak up about the film.

“Making a film to address the efforts of Malaysia’s statesmen is lauded. However, to imply guilt on a particular race and to create an incident is simply irresponsible.

“It can harm moves by our prime minister towards national reconciliation.”

He also warned that Datin Paduka Shuhaimi Baba and the film’s producers will be held liable should any negative events occur due to the film’s racist tone.

The film directed by Shuhaimi depicts the relationship between second prime minister Tun Abdul Razak and his deputy Tun Dr Ismail Abdul Rahman during events surrounding the May 13 racial riots.

However, the film has courted controversy with scenes and dialogue that are racially sensitive. Shuhaimi has said that the film is an interpretation of historical events derived from multiple opinions.

The movie has received negative press partly due to a scene that has been linked to a young Lim Kit Siang urinating at a flagpole outside the house of former Selangor menteri besar Datuk Harun Idris.

Kit Siang denied that such an incident had taken place. No one has publicly come forward to say that it happened.

DAP has continually criticised the film for stoking racial tension, alleging that Tanda Putera pins the racial riots of 1969 on the Chinese.

Shuhaimi had said that after certain parties strongly objected to a scene where a character urinates at a flagpole in front of the house of a former Selangor menteri besar, she edited the scene to tone it down.

However, the edits were only done on the dialogue and the act remained in the movie’s final cut. Shuhaimi defended her work and asked the public to give the film a chance before making judgment.

Tanda Putera was supposed to be aired last year but was postponed three times following protests against several scenes in the movie.

The cost of the movie is estimated to be RM4.8 million and it is a joint effort of Persona Pictures, National Film Development Corporation Malaysia (Finas) and Multimedia Development Corporation (MdeC). – August 27, 2013.

 

Separate fact from fiction, filmmakers told

 

The makers of Tanda Putera should be held responsible if “societal havoc” occurs as a result of the fictionalisation of events surrounding the May 13 riots depicted in the movie, MCA Youth says.

NONEThe urinating scene in the movie portrayed the Chinese community in bad light, but it was not made clear that the scene was purely fictional, MCA Youth chief Wee Ka Siong (left) said in a press statement today.

“If, in the unintended scenario, societal havoc ensues as a result of movie-goers affected by the urinating scene, (director) Shuhaimi Baba and others involved in directing and producing the film must shoulder the responsibility,” said Wee.

The scene involves a group of Chinese youths urinating on a flag pole at former Selangor menteri besar Harun Idris’ residence in Kampung Baru, Kuala Lumpur.

However, a witness, Ahmad Habib, has come out to dispute the veracity of this claim. Ahmad said the flag pole was located within the compound of the house, which was guarded by thousands of people and surrounded by a brick wall.

Shuhaimi has declined comment on this.

Wee said although Shuhaimi had claimed that she had to adopt some degree of “creative licence” to produce the film, it must not be abused to point fingers at anybody or at a particular race.

“To do so, then the film makers should from the start concede that the film is a work of fiction. There must be distinct separation between historical facts and pure fiction,” he said.

He warned that implying the guilt on the part of a particular race was “simply irresponsible” and could harm Prime Minister Najib Abdul Razak’s efforts in bringing national reconciliation.

“What more when the release of Tanda Putera comes just a few days before Malaysia celebrates our 56th year of Independence,” Wee added.

 

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